I photographed these Yellow Rush-Lily flowers at the very end of December, and they were still flowering into January.   In these hot Summer months, few flowers are in bloom, so I was ecstatic that they were so plentiful, and also that they took on a different form from many of the wild lily flowers, having spectacular fluffy stamens.

For some reason, most of the field guides to flowers that I own  don’t even mention them.  I was eventually able to identify them through the VicVeg website, by looking through the list of every yellow flower found in Corrangamite!  It was a little time-consuming,  but time used wisely as I also identified a few other species of yellow flowers  I’d photographed in Spring.   I’ll post  some of these over the next week.

The one guide that does contain a reference and photograph for the Yellow Rush-Lily is  “Plants of Melbourne’s Western Plains:  A Gardener’s Guide to the original flora”  published by the Australian Plants Society, Keilor Plains Group Inc.  This book advises that Yellow Rush-Lilies can be purchased commercially and grown successfully in sunny or lightly shaded positions, in moist well-drained soil.   The location they were growing on our property (for they were all in one area) was partly shaded, and in among grass and moss.  Our soil is very sandy, so the well-drained part fits.  My guess is that the wet December we had contributed to them flowering this year.  I don’t recall them last year.

According to the VicVeg website, the seeds of the Yellow Rush-Lily are long-lived in the soil, so I guess they lay dormant until conditions are right.  I hope to see them in December this year!

Yellow Rush-Lily 1

Until the flowers open, it is difficult to distinguish the plant from grass.

Yellow Rush-Lily 2

Each stem has multiple flowers.

Yellow Rush-Lily 2

Each lobe has a delicate vein leading from the base to the tip, and along with the fluffy yellow stamens make this a small but showy bloom.