We haven’t had a lot of rain, but in the last few weeks, we’ve had scattered showers here and there over a number of days. Measured in millimetres, it wasn’t very much, but measured in newly growing native plants in the bushland, it has been extremely valuable water in our crunchy dry bushland.  For a few days, the ground was wet enough to feel soft. Even so, a few rainless days later, it is crunching underfoot again.

Our Summer has been so dry that even the bracken is dying back, opening up spaces which would otherwise be dark and crowded with bracken fronds. It is heartening to see signs of native regrowth.  Some of these plants are so very tiny, while others are already 30cm to 60cm high.  They are all fine and spindly, making their hold on the earth seem tenuous. I hope the showers continue to fall so they can gain a firmer hold and flourish.  With a bit of luck, and gentle rain, we’ll have some more native flowers soon.

Native plant
This purposeful looking plant is only a couple of inches high. I love its colour and form.
Native plant regrowth
I’m not sure what this plant is, but it seems to be growing in many places.
Native orchid leaf
In a few zones, we are beginmg to see the tiny round leaves that indicate a native orchid is growing. I can’t wait to see the flowers so I can try to identify them.
Native plant regrowth
This plant seems to behave a bit like a ground cover, spreading out as well as up. It, too, is common.
Native plant regrowth
Dead bracken and fallen bark provide some naturally occurring mulch for these native plants.
Plant.
While most of the new growth has short spiky leaves, I found this plant, which doesn’t. I’m not sure if it is a native plant or a blow-in as it is near the fence that backs onto the road. For now I will leave it there, and keep an eye on it.
Native plant regrowth
This plant is another commonly occurring one. Some specimens are already well over 30cm in height.