A week ago I would have walked past hundreds of Scented Sundew plants, and not even noticed that they were there. Having found the first Scented Sundew on Saturday, I’ve had a heightened awareness of tiny leaves, looking for the telltale sticky hairs.  It turns out we have patches of Scented Sundews all over our property, and many of them are just beginning to burst into flower.

It seems to me that there are two types of Scented Sundews – one with red hairs and one with green hairs on the leaves.  However, I can’t find any information that confirms this.  It is purely observational on my part.  Just in case the Sundew with the green hairs happened to be a different type of Sundew, I have looked at as many photographs as I can find, and nothing else matches it, so I’m guessing it must be a type of Scented Sundew. If you know otherwise, please let me know.

As a starting point, here are the first two Scented Sundews, photographed on Saturday. I’ll then compare them with other Scented Sundews I’ve found. More notes on the distinctions are contained in the photo captions.

Scented Sundew
The leaves of the plant clearly show red tinged hairs on the leaves.
Scented Sundew
New buds have red colored stems and sepal.

I have found other Scented Sundews with clearly defined red sticky hairs on the leaves:

Scented Sundew
Found in the lawn leading down to the dam, this Scented Sundew provides a closer look at the flower
Scented Sundew
Nearby, a whole patch of red-tinged Scented Sundews are beginning to open their flower buds.
Scented Sundew
Even the young plants, with emerging leaves, clearly have red coloured hairs.

Heading back into the bushland behind the house, the red does begin to fade:

Scented Sundew
The entire Scented Sundew plant is visible here. While faded, the red tinge is still there on the leaves of the emerging young plant at right..

Contrast the above photos with those shown below.  The leaves are slightly larger, have green-white hairs, and the flower buds and stems are yellow-green. There is no red tinge at all on these plants. They look like they may be a different sub-species, but I can’t find any information to support this.

Scented Sundew
To my eye, the flower buds are more elongated and on longer stems than the red-tinged. Scented Sundew.
Scented Sundew
The young leaves on these plants have green-white hairs. The stem on the unopened bud is green.
Scented Sundew
A clearer view of an unopened bud.
Scented Sundew
An indication of size can be gained from looking at the moss growing alongside these Scented Sundews.

If you have an interest in Sundew plants, and you can provide additional information, I would LOVE to know if these are the same sub-species or different sub-species.

In searching for Sundews, I also came across a plant that may or may not be a Pale Sundew, but I will need to wait and find out when it flowers – if the kangaroos and wallabies don’t eat it in the meantime.  Stay tuned for more Sundews if I find them.  I’ve gained a great interest in these little plants over the past week.