In November, when we built our new fence  (to form part of the cat enclosure) we had to radically prune a few plants, including the beautiful Banksia Rose, a large daisy bush and the jasmine.   In particular, the Banksia Rose was reduced to a stump, and I feared we’d killed it.   Less than four months later, it’s fantastic to see all three plants with healthy growth.   Contrary to all expectations, the Banksia rose is already as tall as our new fence, and growing horizontally along the supporting wires we have strung along the length of the fence.

Garden bed with pruned plants
You can see the bare daisy stems at left, the solid wood trunk of the banksia rose at centre and a space where the jasmine should be at right of the garden bed. This photo was taken on 9 November 2012.
Banksia Roase regrowth
In just under four months, the Banksia Rose has sprouted magnificently. The Superb Fairy Wrens will have a bushy rose to nest in by next Spring.
Daisy Regrowth
The daisy bush is looking very healthy too.
Jasmine Regrowth
Even the jasmine has surprised us with vigorous regrowth.

 

The cultivated garden is not the only area where plants are regenerating.  When we installed our new front fence, some mature eucalypts had to be felled because they were right on the fence line.  On Friday, I noticed that one of the stumps has regrowth higher than the wire fence we installed.  While I knew on an intellectual level that plants do this, especially eucalypts, it affects me on an emotional level to see it in action.  It reminds me how tenuous human hold on  any land actually is.  I think about the ancient ruins beneath the Amazon forest, or those science fiction movies where entire modern cities are swallowed up by the forest.   How wonderous our bushland is.

Tree Stump
This photo was taken on 13 October 2013. As you can see, this tree was cut very close to the ground so the bottom wire could be tensioned over it.
Eucalypt Regrowth
Almost five months later, the regrowth is higher than the wire fence.