For the last week or so, this is what I have seen through my study window:

Cheeky Cockie
“Are you in there” this cockatoo seems to be thinking, as it hangs upside down from the gutter to peer in the window.

Update:

I just took these two photos, which I am adding to the post – even better than the one I originally used!

Animated
The lack of seed is making the Cockatoo even bolder.
Screeching through Windows
In this photo, the Cockatoo is actually screeching very loudly to attract my attention.

 

Now, back to the original post!

Somehow, this Sulphur Crested Cockatoo has figured out that the bird seed is put onto the bird feeder by the people who live in the house.  If I am late putting out the bird seed, the Cockatoo comes looking for me.  The other birds in the flock are not that clever, or else better at feeding themselves.

Once a day is endearing.  However, multiple times a day, accompanied by loud screeching, is not so charming, so bird feeding time keeps changing to coincide with a time when the Cockatoo is not around.

While it is difficult to ignore the cheeky face at the window, and it would be lovely to cultivate a closer connection with a wild creature,  we realise that encouraging the cockatoo’s behavior will only lead to tears in the long run. Cockatoos can be destructive as their beaks are perfectly designed to rip through wood.  On my daily walks, I often see cockatoos pull twigs, bark, and leaves off the eucalypt trees and drop these on the ground.  They seem to do this to while away the time.  I’d prefer they didn’t do this to our house!  Hopefully if we continue to ignore that cheeky face, the bird will get bored and fly back to the trees.

Here it is, sitting on the edge of the decking roof.

Cheeky Cockie
Waiting to be noticed.