Tag: birds of australia

Adult-and=juvenile-Tawny-Frogmouth-on-branch-in-darkness

Tawny Frogmouth

On a warm January night, we were sitting in the lounge room watching TV when a loud bang on the screen door  startled us.  Initially, we couldn’t see anything outside, so Richard grabbed a torch and shone it into a nearby tree.   We saw a bundle of grey feathers and thought it was a solitary owl. Then, out of the…

Female-Australian-Wood-Duck-with-Two-Ducklings

Duckling Story 3

Duckling Story 3 may be a continuation of Duckling Story 2 – it is a bit difficult to interpret these events.   An hour or two after the seven ducklings disappeared into the long grass, we saw a female duck with two ducklings grazing in that green spot all of the ducks seem to love.  We thought ‘Woo hoo! We have…

Pair-Australian-Wood-Duck-with-Ducklings

Duckling Story 2

For some reason I associated the disappearance of the seven ducklings with the first sighting of the Swamp Harrier.   When I check back through the photographs, I note that the single duckling disappeared on that date.  The seven ducklings made their first appearance a week after that date. As is common, the adult Australian Wood Ducks love to graze…

Duckling Story 1

In my last post, I added the Swamp Harrier to my list of birds sighted on the property, lamenting that I had not seen the seven wild ducklings since it appeared.  After going back through my photographs for December, I realise I actually have three stories about ducklings  – all of them ending in mystery. This story actually starts two…

Swamp-harrier-flying

Swamp Harrier (Circus Approximans)

It has been a very long time since I was able to add another bird to the list of species found on our property.  Usually this is a cause of celebration.  However, I am not sure if I am pleased to have spotted this small raptor.  A few days before it appeared, a pair of Australian Wood Ducks walked up…

White-Eared-Honeyeater-searching--for-food-in-tree-bark

White-Eared Honeyeater Hunting

Some days, I’m fortunate to come across an unfazed honeyeater just going about its business of collecting food, like this White-Eared Honeyeater.  I stood and watched for several minutes before I took photographs.  These birds seem very shy, and I was certain if I moved, it would fly off.  Obviously searching for insects and other tasty morsels beneath the bark, the…

eastern-rosella-investigating-native-plant-garden

Eastern Rosella: A closer look

At the unfinished end of the Honeyeater Garden, an Eremophila Maculata plant is about to burst into flower and this Eastern Rosella was very interested in the bush.   One of three Eastern’s, presumably a family group, the bird in my photographs happened to be right outside the window, giving me a chance to get a closer look at the…