Frog Spawn


The Banjo Frogs were calling loudly from the dam in the middle of October.  A day or two later, lots of frog spawn appeared on the surface of the water.  I am guessing we will have a healthy population of Banjo Frogs next year. While I have not seen tadpoles in the dam in previous … Continue reading Frog Spawn

Tawny Frogmouth


On a warm January night, we were sitting in the lounge room watching TV when a loud bang on the screen door  startled us.  Initially, we couldn’t see anything outside, so Richard grabbed a torch and shone it into a nearby tree.   We saw a bundle of grey feathers and thought it was a solitary … Continue reading Tawny Frogmouth

Tachinid Fly (Rutilia lepida)


Out for a quick walk, I didn’t take my macro lens with me.  Pity, because I came across a luminescent insect about 2cm in length, sitting on a broken acacia trunk.  Turns out it was a large parasitic fly. According to Museum Victoria, the Tachinid Fly larvae feed on Scarab Beetle larvae.  The adults also … Continue reading Tachinid Fly (Rutilia lepida)

Duckling Story 3


Duckling Story 3 may be a continuation of Duckling Story 2 – it is a bit difficult to interpret these events.   An hour or two after the seven ducklings disappeared into the long grass, we saw a female duck with two ducklings grazing in that green spot all of the ducks seem to love.  We … Continue reading Duckling Story 3

Duckling Story 1


In my last post, I added the Swamp Harrier to my list of birds sighted on the property, lamenting that I had not seen the seven wild ducklings since it appeared.  After going back through my photographs for December, I realise I actually have three stories about ducklings  – all of them ending in mystery. … Continue reading Duckling Story 1

Swamp Harrier (Circus Approximans)


It has been a very long time since I was able to add another bird to the list of species found on our property.  Usually this is a cause of celebration.  However, I am not sure if I am pleased to have spotted this small raptor.  A few days before it appeared, a pair of … Continue reading Swamp Harrier (Circus Approximans)

A Resilient Echidna


Last year I photographed this Echidna hiding under a log. It was dug firmly into the ground and I had no intentions of disturbing it.  As you can see, the spines on its back are badly damaged, as is the fur.  We have had bushfires in our area, so perhaps it survived a fire, or … Continue reading A Resilient Echidna

The Latest Joey – 3 photos


At long last the newest Eastern Grey joey left the safety of its mother’s pouch in a spot close enough to photograph.  It was only momentary, and to our eyes, it looked like the joey might have fallen out while trying to hang too far out to eat grass.   This one is very active inside … Continue reading The Latest Joey – 3 photos

White-Eared Honeyeater Hunting


Some days, I’m fortunate to come across an unfazed honeyeater just going about its business of collecting food, like this White-Eared Honeyeater.  I stood and watched for several minutes before I took photographs.  These birds seem very shy, and I was certain if I moved, it would fly off.  Obviously searching for insects and other tasty … Continue reading White-Eared Honeyeater Hunting

Kangaroo Courtship


Over the last three years, I’ve been fortunate to observe some of the Eastern Grey Kangaroo courtship behaviour.   In Winter, a new tiny joey peeks out of its mother’s pouch and the dominant male returns to the mob for a while.   This year, the new tiny pink face appeared toward the end of June. … Continue reading Kangaroo Courtship

Eastern Rosella: A closer look


At the unfinished end of the Honeyeater Garden, an Eremophila Maculata plant is about to burst into flower and this Eastern Rosella was very interested in the bush.   One of three Eastern’s, presumably a family group, the bird in my photographs happened to be right outside the window, giving me a chance to get … Continue reading Eastern Rosella: A closer look

Wings


With wings raised, it seemed to be a case of “I’m bigger than you!” and “Oh no, you’re not!” on the bird feeder this week.   We have seen more Cockatoos than usual.  They squabble among themselves for best position, squeezing out the regular feeders, such as this Common Bronzewing Pigeon.  The Pigeon decided to … Continue reading Wings