I’ve held off posting these photographs for a couple of weeks, as one of the Eastern Grey Kangaroo joeys seems almost ready to climb out of the pouch.  I thought I might be able to include photos of the joey hopping around. However, since I took these photos, the kangaroos have been grazing in a different place, where they can’t be seen from the house.

They are still here (I find scatological evidence every morning) so I guess they are protecting the young by keeping their distance from humans.  Wise move.

When I took these photos, on 16 July, the more developed joey was scratching at the ground with its claws, as well as eating grass each time the female kangaroo bent down to eat. Scrabbling about from side to side, the young one seemed eager to look in every direction, and touch the ground at every opportunity. I’d be very surprised if it is not out and about by now.

The less developed joey was still very pink – it had not even grown fur on its face yet.

Four days after I photographed the female kangaroos with their joeys, we had a new young male kangaroo show up.  He was as small as a female kangaroo, and looked both skinny and nervous.   I’m not sure if he was just passing through, or if he has decided to join the group of females.

I can’t wait to catch sight of them again to see what is happening!

Joey
Head and forelimbs out, this young joey is keen to see what is going on.
Joey
At every opportunity, the joey reaches for the ground.
Joey
Mother and joey bask in the early morning sunlight.
Joey
A second, less developed joey only has a quick look around before disappearing inside the pouch again.
Joey
The expression on the female kangaroos face and her stance suggest that the smaller joey is wriggling around a bit.
Joey
It looks like a very large burden to be carrying around all day.
Young Male Kangaroo
We’re not sure where this young male kangaroo came from. He doesn’t look as well fed as the females. We have not sighted him since this photo was taken.