Plain-Lip Spider-orchid (Caladenia clacigera)


We primarily have Brown Clubbed Spider-orchids on our property, but in October 2017 I photographed this Plain-Lip Spider-orchid.  Among a few straggly bracken stems, there were two Plain-lip Spider-orchids, squat and dark compared to the brightly coloured Brown-Clubbed Spider-orchids with their green combs. I missed the orchid season last year, so I don’t know if … Continue reading Plain-Lip Spider-orchid (Caladenia clacigera)

Tawny Frogmouth


On a warm January night, we were sitting in the lounge room watching TV when a loud bang on the screen door  startled us.  Initially, we couldn’t see anything outside, so Richard grabbed a torch and shone it into a nearby tree.   We saw a bundle of grey feathers and thought it was a solitary … Continue reading Tawny Frogmouth

Hedge Wattle (Acacia paradoxa)


Over the years we have been here, I have photographed many plants which are waiting to be identified.  I first photographed Hedge Wattle in 2013 when I spotted a spindly branch dotted with yellow flowers in front of a tree I was trying to capture.  In October 2017 I found another specimen of Hedge Wattle … Continue reading Hedge Wattle (Acacia paradoxa)

Two Kookaburra Chicks


I thought I would start off 2018 with a happy story about Kookie, the kookaburra without tail feathers.   Looking back through my posts, I can see mentions of Kookie “the tailless Kookaburra” since late 2012, but we first really began to observe her in 2014.  Back then, we didn’t know if she was male or … Continue reading Two Kookaburra Chicks

Self-Seeding Cranberry Heath


When we first moved in, almost five years ago now, there were very few native plants around the dam.  We pulled out a heap of Agapanthus plants and a large cactus plant which, to us, were at odds with sclerophyll bushland surrounding it.  Since then, grass grew, kangaroos and wallabies grazed, and each year we … Continue reading Self-Seeding Cranberry Heath

Poison Lobelia (Lobelia pratioides)


Summer flowers are very welcome for the small dots of colour they provide among dry grass and bracken.  These Poison Lobelia flowers were growing right on the edge of the dam in sandy, moist soil.  While I have photographed Poison Lobelia in previous years, I have just realised they were not included in the species … Continue reading Poison Lobelia (Lobelia pratioides)